johnlamb1

Public Relations and Communications professional with experience in healthcare, banking, and retail industries. Avid photographer and former broadcast journalist. Born and raised in Maine. Holds Masters in Mass Communications/Media Management, as well as Accreditation in Public Relations (APR).

Homepage: https://johnlamb1.wordpress.com

35 ways to make 2016 a terrific year

  1. Hang out with people who make you laugh.
  2. Try to do something active every day.
  3. Experience other cultures through travel, books/magazines, events, etc.
  4. Spend less than you earn.
  5. Go to bed earlier.
  6. Get outdoors more.
  7. Volunteer.
  8. Talk with a senior citizen.
  9. Eat a cleaner diet.
  10. Find stress management activities.
  11. Say hello to strangers.
  12. Unplug frequently.
  13. Spend more time with family and friends
  14. Do something outside your comfort zone.
  15. Leave the car and walk or bike to the store.
  16. Listen to music from your youth.
  17. Let people off the hook when they make a mistake.
  18. Take photos of things in nature.
  19. Stretch.
  20. Say “yes” more than “no.”
  21. But learn how to say “no” when you feel overwhelmed.
  22. Clean out the clutter.
  23. Make new friends.
  24. Connect with old friends.
  25. Watch an old movie.
  26. Honor your commitments.
  27. Do your taxes earlier.
  28. Ramp up your retirement savings.
  29. Take all of the vacation time you’ve earned.
  30. Pat yourself on the back once in a while.
  31. Replace television time with a hobby.
  32. Take a class.
  33. Tackle that home project that’s been hanging over your head.
  34. Live knowing that every day could be your last.
  35. Tell your loved ones how you feel.

Your turn. What ideas do you have to make 2016 a great year?

,

Leave a comment

Are you prepared for an emergency?

Could you manage without electricity for a couple of days? What if a major storm left you stranded at home? Or worse, if a hurricane drove you from your home?

While Emergency management experts stress the importance of personal readiness, Americans are, in general, woefully unprepared for the next disaster that might lurk around the corner.

I recently appeared on Maine Watch, a news program on the Maine Public Broadcasting Network with Joshua Frances, MPH, an emergency management expert, to discuss personal preparedness, and what Americans can — and should — do to be ready when an emergency arises.

“Preparing for an emergency helps you better manage it,” says Josh, who shares the belief that personal preparedness is a civic responsibility we all share. “By preparing for a disaster, you also reduce the odds that emergency responders will be called to assist you,” he says. “This frees them up to aid those who may unable to fend for themselves and really need help — such as the elderly or those with health issues.”

So, what should you do to prepare?

Consider the possibilities
First, identify what emergencies you’re most likely to encounter in your area. For example, New Englanders should look at the possibility of an ice storm knocking power, while those in the Midwest might want to think about preparing for a tornado.

From there, consider what the impact would be, and how you could prepare for the worst. Some things to consider:

  • Have a family disaster plan and have practice it. Include all family members in planning and practice.
  • Have at least one member of your household is trained in first aid and CPR/AED.

A “Shelter in Place Kit” helps you ride out an event, such as a blizzard, if you decide to hunker down at home. Items to include:

  • First Aid kit
  • Blankets
  • Flashlights and batteries
  • Radio
  • Water – plan for one gallon per person per day
  • Non-perishable food

Be Ready to ‘Go’
Some circumstances might drive you from your home. To prepare for these, such as home fires, make a “Go Bag,” with essential items:

  • List of medications and health care providers
  • Emergency contact information
  • Emergency clothing
  • Cash
  • Games for the kids
  • Identification
  • Pet food, toys, extra leash

Note: Keep your important papers protected from the elements in a plastic bag

Pack the car
It’s also wise to keep some basic emergency supplies in your car, should you be stranded:

  • Warm clothing – hats, wool socks, gloves
  • Flashlight
  • First Aid Kit
  • Sand (for traction if you’re stuck)
  • Reflectors
  • Snacks

Final thoughts
Home fires are the most common , and deadliest type of disaster, so make sure your house has working smoke alarms in every bedroom, outside sleeping areas, and on every level. While you’re at it, add a carbon monoxide detector on each level, too.

And, don’t wait until the last minute to prepare. You’ll find long lines and short supplies at the store.

Learn more about preparedness at Ready.gov

Related Post:
Sandy’s devastation reminds us to be prepared

,

Leave a comment

Let’s talk turkey with a Thanksgiving quiz

Pilgrim_7908Thanksgiving traditionally marks the start of the holiday shopping season. To begin the celebration, let’s see how well you know the holiday with a short quiz (answers below):

  1. While Christmas is always December 25, where can Thanksgiving be found on the calendar?
  2. True or false. The origins of Thanksgiving can be traced back to the 1600s?
  3. Who sings the Thanksgiving Song?
  4. Which President declared Thanksgiving a national holiday?
  5. The National Foot League features three games on Thanksgiving day. The Detroit Lions are one of two teams on the schedule each year. Name the other team.
  6. How much turkey do Americans eat on Thanksgiving?
    A) 50 million pounds
    B) 250 million pounds
    C) More than 750 million pounds
  7. What is the name of the parade that takes place that day? Bonus points if you know its original name.
  8. Each year, the President of the United States pardons a turkey. Who started that tradition?
  9. When the Butterball Turkey Talk-Line opened in 1981, six people responded to 11,000 calls. How many will the call center answer this year?
  10. Which state produces the most cranberries? Hint: it also leads the nation in production of cheese.

 

Answers

  1. Thanksgiving is the fourth Thursday in November.
  2. True. The Pilgrims celebrated their first harvest in 1621. According to sources, it included 50 people who traveled on the Mayflower and 90 Native Americans.
  3. Adam Sandler sings the Thanksgiving Song.
  4. President Abraham Lincoln proclaimed the fourth Thursday in November Thanksgiving in 1863.
  5. The Dallas Cowboys join the Detroit Lions as NFL regulars on Thanksgiving Day.
  6. According to the National Turkey Federation, approximately 736 million pounds of turkey were consumed in the United States during Thanksgiving in 2012.
  7. The Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade was originally the Macy’s Christmas Parade.
  8. The origins of the Presidential Turkey Pardon are somewhat fuzzy, but Presidents Lincoln and Kennedy are both believed to have spared a turkey. The first official “pardon” was issued by President George H.W. Bush in 1989. Give yourself a point if you named any of these leaders.
  9. More than 50 experts on the Butterball Turkey Talk-Line will respond to 100,000 calls this year.
  10. Wisconsin holds the title of largest producer of cranberries, followed by Massachusetts.

Scoring
1- 4   You’re at the kids table
5 – 8   You’ve earned an extra serving
9 – 10   The drumstick is yours!

, ,

Leave a comment

More lessons from the Greatest Generation

Like many around our nation, I’ve admired the contributions of the group called the Greatest Generation — those who grew up in the Great Depression, fought in World War II, and returned to raise the Baby Boomers. I touched on this in an earlier blog, and last week’s Veterans Day made me think more about what this amazing group of people did, and the lessons they left us.

So, Installment Two of Lessons from the Greatest Generation:

Don’t sweat the small stuff
One woman — married more than 50 years — said the low divorce rate among her generation was due to the hardship they endured, from the depression to the war. By comparison, she noted, many common marital spats seemed inconsequential.

Happiness is more than money
Ever wonder why people from that generation like to tell stories about their youth? Because they were happy times. They had little material wealth, and yet, were still happy. Life was an adventure, not a purchase-driven journey.

Be humble
As much as the generation is asked about its sacrifice – whether supporting the war effort or working extra hours to provide for the family – you rarely hear boastful responses. My uncle, a tank driver in WW II, would shrug when I’d talk about his sacrifice. Despite the contributions, there was never a sense of entitlement.

Family comes first
This generation set the standard for family. They worked hard to provide a better life for their children, and were more involved in the family than prior generations.

Embrace change
Has any generation experienced more change? Growing up, they watched horse-drawn carriages deliver blocks of ice to keep food cold. Clothes were washed by hand and hung on a line in the back yard. Decades later, every home has a car, refrigerator, and washer/dryer. And let’s not forget the shift from pencils and ledgers to computers.

Save money, manage debt
Despite modest wages, the Greatest Generation managed to avoid debt and build a nice nest egg. If something was beyond their financial reach, they didn’t buy it, and cash was king.

Manners matter
Please, thank you, and you’re welcome. This generation knew the importance — and power — of these words.

Your turn. What did you learn from the Greatest Generation?

, , ,

Leave a comment

16 Tips for hopeful PR practitioners

I was recently interviewed by a budding PR practitioner for a college class. The conversation made me think about the pros and cons of the business, and what I wish someone had told me in the early years.

Thumbs Up

  • A great variety of tasks ensures you’ll never be bored — from writing to photography to media relations.
  • You get to do a lot of fun things. Top of my list? Taking courtside photos at a Boston Celtics game. I’ve also done aerial photography and handled media relations for an event that featured former Secretary of State George Mitchell as the keynote speaker.
  • You learn a lot. About a lot of things.
  • And get to hang with interesting people — celebrities, authors, elected officials, company leaders, and national media. One of my favorites was working at a Leon Redbone concert, and being in the Green Room after the show.
  • The CEO knows your name and returns your emails.
  • PR people have a seat at the table, whether in a leadership meeting or a crisis response.

Thumbs Down

  • Along with the variety comes a high degree of unpredictability. Issues and projects have an interesting way of popping up at the wrong time.
  • You’ll run across people who think they know your job and — often well-intentioned — tell you how to do it.
  • Pressure. PR has been listed among the most stressful jobs.
  • Lack of control – you can do everything correct and still not have the outcome you desire: rain washes out your outdoor event; a significant event bounces your story off the news, etc.
  • 24/7 – Lots of things happen off work hours, from customer events to a middle-of-the-night crisis.
    Your mistakes are often public.

Doing the Job

  • Ask questions – If something confuses you, it likely has the same effect on your audience.
  • Show common sense – Be the person who says, “This doesn’t pass the straight-face test.”
  • Know numbers – A good business sense helps you understand your organization and boosts your credibility.
  • Be quick – The clock is often ticking, so learn to write and think quickly.
  • Act with integrity – It’s the right thing to do and you’re asking for trouble if you veer off course.

Your turn, PR people. What advice would you share with a hopeful practitioner?

, , , , ,

Leave a comment

You’re just one word away from being a better writer

There is a simple secret to improve your writing — and your communications in general. Okay, it’s not really a secret, but it is very, very simple.

Use “you” more often.

Yup, I’m serious. Do that and you’re on your way to being a better writer and communicator.

Have a conversation
Using “you” (or forms of it) shifts your messages from talking at someone to speaking with them, making your message more personal and conversational.

Let’s look at a couple of examples to illustrate:
Old School: “Benefit enrollment packets will be mailed to employee’ homes in November.”
New style: “Look for your Benefit Enrollment Packets, coming in the mail in November.”

Old School: Students should return their permission forms by Tuesday.”
New Style: Please return your permission forms by Tuesday.”

Old School : “Members and their families are invited to attend the annual banquet….”
New Style: “You and your family are invited to the annual banquet…”

Be casual and clear
As you can see, incorporating “you” makes your writing more casual, conversational, and clear, while the old school way of referring to your audience in the third person is impersonal, and frankly, a little boring. And “you” is almost like calling someone by their name, one of the best attention grabbers available to communicators.

So give it a try and let me know what you think. While you’re at it, toss a “we” or two. I think you’ll like what you see.

, , , ,

Leave a comment

21 bits of investment wisdom from the years

I’ve been intrigued by investing for years, and lately find myself engaged in frequent conversations about the topic with friends.

Here are some of the best tips I’ve picked up over the years. Please keep in mind that I’m not a financial advisor, and you may want to consult with one if this motivates you to dabble in the market.

  1. Keep your costs low, whether you go with a low-fee mutual fund or a stock reinvestment program offered by many corporations.
  2. Time is your greatest ally – start young.
  3. In general, the greater the potential reward, the greater the risk — and many people don’t think enough about risk.
  4. Read everything you can about Warren Buffett.
  5. In most cases, your home is not an investment.
  6. Think twice about investing in things you don’t understand.
  7. Pay yourself first. A 401 (k) plan where you work is a great option and you’ll probably never miss the money from your paycheck.
  8. Playing too safe brings the risk of not keeping up with inflation, and seeing the purchasing power of your dollar drop.
  9. Putting your investments on autopilot is an easy way to save. For example, you can make automatic, monthly contributions to an Individual Retirement Account (IRA) from your bank account.
  10. Every little bit helps, and adds up over time.
  11. Put enough into your employer’s 401 (k) to earn the company match. If the plan matches the first 6 percent of your contribution at 50 percent, you’re immediately turning $100, for example, into $150.
  12. People know the mantra “buy low and sell high,” but often do the opposite. A dip in the market might bring an opportunity.
  13. Diversifying your investments helps spread your risk by avoiding “too many eggs in one basket” syndrome.
  14. The web has a wealth of investment tools. Use them to help you make decisions about investment options, risk, retirement planning, and more.
  15. Spend less than you earn.
  16. Know your tolerance for risk and invest accordingly. It’s very likely different from mine, from your neighbors, co-workers, etc. Be realistic about how much you can risk, and how much of a loss you could tolerate.
  17. Building an emergency fund is a top priority.
  18. Follow the data, and invest in something because it makes sense, not because you love the company’s product line or because your neighbor says it’s a great investment.
  19. On the other hand, if you really like a product, consider looking into the company to see if it makes sense as an investment.
  20. While the stock market is generally considered the best long-term investment, making money in stocks is far from guaranteed.
  21. As with anything in life, if something is too good to be true, it probably isn’t.

Your turn. What’s the best investment advice you know?

, , , ,

Leave a comment

5 Lessons From the Sharks

I recently discovered ABC’s Shark Tank, a show that brings together entrepreneurs who ask a group of billionaire “Sharks” to invest in their product or service.

Even if you’re not an entrepreneur, the show is interesting and provides some good tips about business and finance:

Prepare
Whether you’re interviewing for a job or applying for a loan, the person on the other side of the table will have a list of questions for you. Anticipate what they might ask, and be ready with responses — and data to back them. How? See the next bullet….

Know your audience
It seems as if some of the entrepreneurs on Shark Tank have never watched the show. For example, offering a 5 percent share of your company in exchange for a Shark’s investment pretty much guarantees a black mark on you ledger, yet it continues to happen. Before you walk into a meeting, learn as much as possible about the interviewer, client, employer, etc., to avoid making obvious blunders.

Be respectful
The Sharks can be harsh at times, but the entrepreneurs pitching their products need to stay on the high road. Rudeness often brings a quick dismissal from center stage.

Listen to experts
In addition to their financial investment, the Sharks bring a wealth of knowledge. Some entrepreneurs take their advice to heart; to others it sounds like Charlie Brown’s teacher. If a successful person offers a suggestion, listen carefully.

Be flexible and realistic
Entrepreneurs often walk away empty-handed after turning down a counter offer from a Shark. One man declined a multi-million dollar deal for his company. Understandably, he has a passion for the product, but $4 million is a big hunk of change to pass up. Think carefully before you turn down an opportunity because it differs from your original plan.

Your turn. What lessons have you learned from watching Shark Tank?

, , , , , , ,

Leave a comment

Summer reading? Here are 9 great book choices

Flowers are blooming, kids are anxious for school vacation, and it’s time to be thinking about summer. If your idea of a day well spent is bringing a book to the beach, here are a few that you’ll enjoy:

11/22/63, Stephen King
While the book focuses on man who travels back in time to stop the Kennedy assassination, his life prior to the fateful day are what makes this book so enjoyable.

Summer of ‘49, David Halberstam
Halberstam follows the 1949 pennant race between the Red Sox and Yankees, weaving in stories about Ted Williams, the DiMaggio brothers, and the other players that suited up for this magical season.

Unbroken: A World War II Story of Survival, Resilience, and Redemption, Laura Hillenbrand
The inspiring story of Louis Zamperini, the Olympian runner who was stranded at sea for more than 40 days, and became a POW during World War II.

Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone, J.K. Rowlings
The first book in the Harry Potter series introduces us to the young wizard and the brilliant imagination of J.K. Rowling’s.

Small Vices, Robert Parker
One of the best of Parker’s Spencer series, the Boston private eye almost meets his match.

The Hunger Games, Suzanne Collins
Girl with bow competes in government-sanctioned, televised fight-to-the-death.

The DaVinci Code, Dan Brown
Murder, religious cover-up, and symbolism combine to make this a first-class whodunit.

Tuesdays with Morrie, Mitch Albom
Albom’s affectionate story about a former college professor who is in the final stages of ALS, and the lessons he still teaches.

The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
Classic stories of the great detective.

Your turn. What are your favorite summer reads?

Leave a comment

Test your knowledge of movie quotes

Everyone loves a good movie. Let’s see how well you remember some notable quotes from a few flicks from years past. Answers at the bottom.

Quotes

  1. “You’re going to need a bigger boat.”
  2. “Frankly, Scarlett, I don’t give a damn.”
  3. “I’ll be back.”
  4. “Hello. My name is Inigo Montoya. You killed my father. Prepare to die.”
  5. “You had me at ‘Hello.'”
  6. “A Cinderella story … former greens keeper, now about to become the Master’s champion.”
  7. “May the odds be ever in your favor.”
  8. “Snakes. Why does it have to be snakes?”
  9. “Was it over when the Germans bombed Pearl Harbor?”
  10. “Hey Stella!”
  11. “Why so serious?”
  12. “To infinity and beyond.”
  13. “Say hello to my little friend.”
  14. I think I’ll miss you most of all.”
  15. “It was beauty killed the beast.”
  16. “Rosebud.”
  17. “So, come up to the lab, and see what’s on the slab.”
  18. “I solemnly swear that I am up to no good.”
  19. “I wish the ring had never come to me.”
  20. “You’ve got to ask yourself one question, ‘Do I feel lucky? Well, do you, punk?'”

Answers

  1. Jaws
  2. Gone with the Wind
  3. The Terminator (and a couple of other Schwarzenegger movies)
  4. Princess Bride
  5. Jerry McGuire
  6. Caddyshack
  7. The Hunger Games
  8. Raiders of the Lost Ark
  9. Animal House
  10. Streetcar Named Desire
  11. The Dark Knight
  12. Toy Story
  13. Scarface
  14. The Wizard of Oz
  15. King Kong
  16. Citizen Kane
  17. The Rocky Horror Picture Show
  18. Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban
  19. The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring
  20. Dirty Harry

Scoring
1-5         Left on the cutting room floor
6 – 10     Co-star
11 – 15   Oscar nominee
16 – 20   A-list celebrity

Leave a comment

%d bloggers like this: