Archive for November, 2015

Let’s talk turkey with a Thanksgiving quiz

Pilgrim_7908Thanksgiving traditionally marks the start of the holiday shopping season. To begin the celebration, let’s see how well you know the holiday with a short quiz (answers below):

  1. While Christmas is always December 25, where can Thanksgiving be found on the calendar?
  2. True or false. The origins of Thanksgiving can be traced back to the 1600s?
  3. Who sings the Thanksgiving Song?
  4. Which President declared Thanksgiving a national holiday?
  5. The National Foot League features three games on Thanksgiving day. The Detroit Lions are one of two teams on the schedule each year. Name the other team.
  6. How much turkey do Americans eat on Thanksgiving?
    A) 50 million pounds
    B) 250 million pounds
    C) More than 750 million pounds
  7. What is the name of the parade that takes place that day? Bonus points if you know its original name.
  8. Each year, the President of the United States pardons a turkey. Who started that tradition?
  9. When the Butterball Turkey Talk-Line opened in 1981, six people responded to 11,000 calls. How many will the call center answer this year?
  10. Which state produces the most cranberries? Hint: it also leads the nation in production of cheese.

 

Answers

  1. Thanksgiving is the fourth Thursday in November.
  2. True. The Pilgrims celebrated their first harvest in 1621. According to sources, it included 50 people who traveled on the Mayflower and 90 Native Americans.
  3. Adam Sandler sings the Thanksgiving Song.
  4. President Abraham Lincoln proclaimed the fourth Thursday in November Thanksgiving in 1863.
  5. The Dallas Cowboys join the Detroit Lions as NFL regulars on Thanksgiving Day.
  6. According to the National Turkey Federation, approximately 736 million pounds of turkey were consumed in the United States during Thanksgiving in 2012.
  7. The Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade was originally the Macy’s Christmas Parade.
  8. The origins of the Presidential Turkey Pardon are somewhat fuzzy, but Presidents Lincoln and Kennedy are both believed to have spared a turkey. The first official “pardon” was issued by President George H.W. Bush in 1989. Give yourself a point if you named any of these leaders.
  9. More than 50 experts on the Butterball Turkey Talk-Line will respond to 100,000 calls this year.
  10. Wisconsin holds the title of largest producer of cranberries, followed by Massachusetts.

Scoring
1- 4   You’re at the kids table
5 – 8   You’ve earned an extra serving
9 – 10   The drumstick is yours!

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More lessons from the Greatest Generation

Like many around our nation, I’ve admired the contributions of the group called the Greatest Generation — those who grew up in the Great Depression, fought in World War II, and returned to raise the Baby Boomers. I touched on this in an earlier blog, and last week’s Veterans Day made me think more about what this amazing group of people did, and the lessons they left us.

So, Installment Two of Lessons from the Greatest Generation:

Don’t sweat the small stuff
One woman — married more than 50 years — said the low divorce rate among her generation was due to the hardship they endured, from the depression to the war. By comparison, she noted, many common marital spats seemed inconsequential.

Happiness is more than money
Ever wonder why people from that generation like to tell stories about their youth? Because they were happy times. They had little material wealth, and yet, were still happy. Life was an adventure, not a purchase-driven journey.

Be humble
As much as the generation is asked about its sacrifice – whether supporting the war effort or working extra hours to provide for the family – you rarely hear boastful responses. My uncle, a tank driver in WW II, would shrug when I’d talk about his sacrifice. Despite the contributions, there was never a sense of entitlement.

Family comes first
This generation set the standard for family. They worked hard to provide a better life for their children, and were more involved in the family than prior generations.

Embrace change
Has any generation experienced more change? Growing up, they watched horse-drawn carriages deliver blocks of ice to keep food cold. Clothes were washed by hand and hung on a line in the back yard. Decades later, every home has a car, refrigerator, and washer/dryer. And let’s not forget the shift from pencils and ledgers to computers.

Save money, manage debt
Despite modest wages, the Greatest Generation managed to avoid debt and build a nice nest egg. If something was beyond their financial reach, they didn’t buy it, and cash was king.

Manners matter
Please, thank you, and you’re welcome. This generation knew the importance — and power — of these words.

Your turn. What did you learn from the Greatest Generation?

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